Academic Integrity Week 2021: Some Events at the University of Calgary

September 29, 2021

Academic Integrity Week 2021Institutions across Alberta and other provinces, as well as in Europe, are hosting a simultaneous Academic Integrity Week, October 18-22, 2021. At the University of Calgary we are pleased to be running multiple events, some of which are run for and by students, and others designed for educators and staff. The Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning at the University of Calgary is hosting three webinars, which are free and open to the public. Note that all times listed are in Calgary (Mountain) time.

The Intersection of Academic Integrity and Mental Health: From Resources to Policies

Through discussions and activities, participants will examine academic integrity through a mental health lens. One of the topics addressed in this session include the impact of the academic misconduct process on student and faculty mental health. At a structural level, one of the topics highlighted will be bringing a mental health perspective to the development or review of academic integrity-related policies, processes and procedures. The session will conclude with Q&A, as well as resources to support student and faculty mental health and wellbeing.

Facilitator: Andrew Szeto, PhD
Date: Tuesday, October 19, 2021
Time: 12 – 1 p.m.

Contract Cheating in Alberta and Beyond

Join us for an eye-opening webinar about contract cheating in Alberta. We will talk about essay mills, homework completion services, unethical tutoring services, and thesis consultation services that all cross the line into academic misconduct. Learn about the size and scope of this predatory industry and how it preys on our students, including engaging in blackmail and extortion.

Facilitator: Sarah Elaine Eaton, PhD and Sheryl Boisvert
Date: Wednesday, October 20, 2021
Time: 4 – 5:30 p.m.
Locations: Online via Zoom

FOIP Training for Academic Integrity

Learn how the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIP) applies when there are suspected or actual breaches of academic integrity. Learn what information can be shared, with whom and why.

Facilitator: Katharine Kinnear (FOIP Coordinator, Legal Services) and Jennifer Sinclair (FOIP Advisor, Legal Services)
Date: Friday, October 22, 2021
Time: 12 – 1 p.m.
Location: Online via Zoom

For more details and to register, visit the website: https://taylorinstitute.ucalgary.ca/series-and-events/integrity-week

Please share this information with your networks.

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This blog has had over 2 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton, PhD, is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, and the Educational Leader in Residence, Academic Integrity, University of Calgary, Canada.

Opinions are my own and do not represent those of the University of Calgary or anyone else.


Academic Integrity: Transforming Invisible work into Visible and Valued Work

July 7, 2021

In a previous post I talked about how the work of academic integrity is often invisible and unrecognized. Today I wanted to share some exciting news. Over the past couple of years, colleagues at the University of Calgary have been working hard to update an old and outdated manual to address hiring, merit assessment, tenure and promotion for academic staff.

In the fall of 2020, I had an opportunity to connect with the two project leads, Dr. Florentine Strzelczyk and Dr. Francine Smith, to speak specifically about matters relating to ethics and integrity. We talked about the invisible nature of academic integrity work and how I’d heard anecdotally from colleagues that for those without a formal leadership appointment, such as an Associate Dean who investigates and adjudicates academic misconduct allegations and cases, had no formal mechanism to have work relating to academic integrity recognized when it came to our bi-annual review as faculty members. Similarly, there was no formal way to showcase this work in an application for hiring, tenure or promotion.

Dr. Strzelczyk and Dr. Smith listened closely and asked insightful questions about how academic integrity work could be better recognized as legitimate academic work at our university. Generally, our work as professors is broadly classified into three main categories: Research, Teaching, and Service. The amount of time we spend working in each area depends on the type of appointment you have, but in most cases, academic staff are expected to contribute to all three areas.

We had an open and collegial exchange about which categories academic integrity work would fall into. There are a limited number of us at our university who conduct research into academic integrity, so instead we focused on teaching and service. It became obvious that academic integrity work certainly counts towards service when it involves reporting and preparing evidence when a breach of integrity (i.e., academic misconduct) is suspected. We also talked about how it should also be recognized as a teaching and learning contribution. We talked about the need to recognize effort that goes into conceptualizing, designing, and implementing ethical assessments, for example. We explored the idea that when a professor takes time to prepare materials to teach their students how to learn ethically (e.g., developing tip sheets for their students on how to cite and reference properly) that these activities are related to teaching and learning, rather than service. We talked about how faculty work relating to academic integrity isn’t about teaching or service, but rather teaching and service.

I was really impressed with how my colleagues listened and responded. They incorporated changes into the handbook that I’m really quite ecstatic about and I wanted to share with you the specific language around these updates, so that if you are thinking about updating your own faculty handbooks on your campus, this might serve as a model.

The new University of Calgary GFC Academic Staff Criteria & Process Handbook was officially approved last month by our General Faculties Council (GFC) one of the highest governance bodies of the university. In the handbook, academic integrity is now officially recognized as part of our Teaching (Section 1.3) and Service (Section 1.4) responsibilities. The specific passages where academic integrity is highlighted are as follows: 

“Teaching may take different forms such as direct or classroom instruction at undergraduate and/or graduate levels, as well as competency-based education, and/or field and practicum supervision. Teaching activities may include lectures, seminars, tutorials, laboratories, clinical sets, advising/counselling, creating lesson plans, assessments, grading, and examinations, and upholding academic integrity. Delivery of instruction and support of student learning may be face-to-face, on-line and blended and may occur inside and outside of the classroom, on and off campus (including land-based education), in collaboration with other instructors, other faculties, associated institutions, community organizations or with Indigenous knowledge-keepers and communities.” (Bolding added).

GFC Academic Staff Criteria & Process Handbook (Section 1.3.3, p. 10)

and

“Service to the University may include participation in Program or Unit-level, Department or Division, Faculty, and University committees, councils, task forces, ad hoc teams, and governing bodies, or other parts of the University including the Faculty Association. Activities that contribute to upholding academic and research integrity across various parts of the academy shall also be considered as important service contributions to the University.” (Bolding added).

GFC Academic Staff Criteria & Process Handbook (Section 1.4.3, p. 11)

This is the first time, to the best of my knowledge, that academic has been explicitly named in our institutional faculty handbook in this way. To say I am excited about this is an understatement!

The details of exactly how this work can be recognized has yet to be determined, and the devil is always in the details, as they say. Nevertheless, we now have a mechanism by which it can be recognized and that in itself is a huge step forward.

I am hopeful that this will provide colleagues on campus with a means to move academic integrity work from being invisible to being not only visible, but also valued. I also hope that other institutions, both universities and colleges alike, will take similar action to ensure that the work that goes into upholding and enacting academic and research integrity is clearly acknowledged as being legitimate and important contributions to the role of an academic staff member.

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This blog has had over 2 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton, PhD, is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, and the Educational Leader in Residence, Academic Integrity, University of Calgary, Canada.

Opinions are my own and do not represent those of the University of Calgary or anyone else.


My thoughts on the quip, “do your research” (Guest post: Astrid Kendrick)

April 23, 2021

I don’t normally have guest posts on my blog, but after reading this piece posted by my friend and colleague, Astrid Kendrick, PhD, a fellow faculty member at the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, I reached out to her to see if she would allow me to amplify her message by sharing it on my blog. Here is Dr. Kendrick’s post, shared with her permission.

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My thoughts on the quip, “do your research”

Astrid Kendrick,EdD

Astrid Kendrick, EdDFacebook Status Update originally posted on April 22, 2021

I have the good fortune to be a funded (meaning paid) researcher over the past couple of years, which means I actually do my own research. It’s actually quite complicated, so here’s a brief (okay, lengthy) summary of how I “do my own research”.

Firstly, and most importantly, I have to do a comprehensive literature review on my research subject. This involves reading a ton of primary sources (e.g., peer-reviewed research articles, philosophical books). Normally, I don’t read secondary sources (e.g., news articles, websites) as those authors are only reporting on what they think primary researchers have said. If I do read about a study from a secondary source, I seek out the primary source and read that too. Often, the secondary reporting misses out on or misrepresents crucial details from the primary source.

This stage takes about 6-8 months and involves reading, understanding, and processing a lot of information. If you look at a citation page for any one of my papers, you’ll see that I usually cite about 20-50 sources. I have usually read twice the number of articles or books that I cite to figure out which actually relate to my research subject. Reading everything includes reading critique of the field to limit my bias.

Once I have read all the things – yes, all of them, including new stuff that’s published while I’m reading the old stuff – then I can apply for ethics approval to do a research study. Getting ethics takes 1-4 months, depending on how busy all my colleagues in that department are. I have to prove, as a part of this process, that my research will do no harm, I will mitigate all risks to human participants, and that I actually have read all the things about my topic. Without ethics approval, my research can’t go forward.

Once everything is read and ethics is approved, then I can do unique research, which necessitates keeping an open and flexible mind about my research subject, finding suitable participants, and collecting related policy or other documents, a stage known as collecting data. This part takes 4-5 months. In the case of my current podcasting study, data collection will take a year and for my compassion fatigue study, data collection has taken nearly 16 months.

Once the data is collected (usually by a research assistant which is why funding is great), I have to read, understand, and connect all of it (interviews, surveys, documents) and determine if what my participants have said or written lines up with all the reading I’ve already done. Not only do I have to know enough about the field to recognize when my findings reinforce already known information, but I also need enough knowledge to recognize unique or ground-breaking findings.

I then get to write about what my specific study has to say in relation to the rest of the known field, and decide if my findings are worth publishing. If I think so (in consultation with my research partners and collaborators), then I submit my writing for publication.

Being published in a quality peer-reviewed journal can take 1-2 years. The journal editors and other scholars in the field read through how my research study was constructed, how I collected ethical data, and they (also having read all the things on the topic) decide if indeed, my findings were either unique or further knowledge in the field. Normally, 2-3 reviewers read and decide if my article is well articulated, my study is valid, and then they force me to re-write it a couple more times so that it fits the standards of the publication journal.

Even those short Conversation Canada articles I’ve written are editorially reviewed and take about 1-2 months of re-writing after the initial submission to the editor. Sidebar: The Conversation only publishes articles by scholars speaking to their own unique research, so before my article is accepted, I have to demonstrate to their editors that I am writing about unique research and not simply writing an opinion.

So, “doing my research” is an exceptionally time-consuming process and tends to last several years. It rarely involves using Google, although I admit that Google Scholar can be helpful in finding newer open access articles not available through my university library.

Therefore, if you ask me about my topics of research (currently compassion fatigue, burnout, emotional labour, preservice teacher education, literacy instruction, and podcasting), you can be pretty certain that I know a lot about them, and you can trust my responses. You can even trust that if I say, “you need to read these 10 articles and three books”, it’s because I’ve read everything else, and those readings are the significant ones in the field. I’m actually saving you time from reading the hundreds of other articles that I’ve read on the subject that were irrelevant, difficult to read, or have similar findings.

If you ask me for my opinion on a hundred other topics, you’re getting just that. I’ve probably read some secondary sources on the topic, and likely even talked to some of my expert colleagues on their research and read the 10 articles they recommended, but my depth of knowledge is not the same as what I know about my research topics. I have not “done my research”, I have simply constructed an informed opinion that I’m willing to change based on new information from expert sources.

Thanks for reading, and to Sarah for posting, because now my husband, John doesn’t have to listen to my “What doing real research means!” rants on our daily walks anymore.

Follow Astrid Kendrick on Twitter.

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This blog has had over 2 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton, PhD, is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, and the Educational Leader in Residence, Academic Integrity, University of Calgary, Canada.

Opinions are my own and do not represent those of the University of Calgary or anyone else.

Follow me on Twitter.


Public talk: “The Latest Research on Big Tech and the Cheating Industry” – November 5, 2020

November 1, 2020

CPL logo

I’m excited to be working with the Knowledge Engagement Team at the Calgary Public Library to give a talk next week on contract cheating and term paper mills.

Description

Explore the world of essay-mills, homework completion services, academic-file sharing sites and other contract cheating companies. Ads on social media are often framed as “help”, implying and promoting academic misconduct. Learn how the industry works, how they trick students into buying from them, and the consequences that can ensue.

Date: Thursday, November 5, 2020

Time: 19:00 – 20:00 (Mountain Time)

Where: Online

Register here.

Audience: This is a general interest talk is intended for the public. Everyone is welcome.

Registration is required. The link to attend will be sent to registered participants.

This talk will not be recorded, but if you can’t make it feel free to connect with me about doing a presentation for your group.

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This blog has had over 2 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton, PhD, is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, and the Educational Leader in Residence, Academic Integrity, University of Calgary, Canada. Opinions are my own and do not represent those of the University of Calgary.


Webinar: Indigenous Paradigms in Practice: Relationships, Story and Academic Integrity

September 29, 2020

Indigenous Academic Integrity Webinar - Keeta Gladue

Indigenous peoples are diverse distinct nations who carry the knowledge of millennia. As Indigenous peoples we know that knowledge must be authentic, validated, and shared through principled action. Join us as we discuss the paradigms and principles of academic integrity based on the values of our Communities. Providing the philosophical and the practical, this webinar is designed to explore Indigenous approaches to knowledge for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous members of the post-secondary community.

Keeta Gladue Headshot (web size)Presenter bio: Keeta Gladue is a proud professional Indigenous nerd (IndigENerd), who believes in changing the world through pop culture references, humour and storytelling. When we explore the stories we tell, ask who told them and why, and look for the stories that remain untold, we better understand the world around us. Holding degrees in English, psychology and social work, Keeta is a current graduate student at the University of Calgary in the social work leadership program. She is the current Indigenous Student Program Advisor at Writing Symbols Lodge (The University of Calgary’s Indigenous student support centre) supporting diversity, equity and inclusion. A recent TEDx speaker, Keeta is committed to supporting intercultural engagement and understanding. As a passionate lover of learning she hopes to infect others with curiosity and wonder about how the world works, and even more, inspire them to imagine and work towards what it could be.

Webinar date: Friday, 13 November, 2020

Time: 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Mountain Time. Please convert to your own local time zone. All registered participants will receive a link to the recording after the live session.

Deadline to register: 11 November, 2020

Register here.

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This blog has had over 2 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton, PhD, is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, and the Educational Leader in Residence, Academic Integrity, University of Calgary, Canada. Opinions are my own and do not represent those of the University of Calgary.


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