50 years after “I have a dream” U.S. college residences implement “self-segregation” based on religion

August 28, 2013

On the day of the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.’s now famous “I have a dream” speech, Inside Higher Ed. published an article on self-segregation at U.S. college residences.

The article is titled “Residence Halls Get Religion” and talks specifically about residences that favour Roman Catholic and Christian students. Students of other faiths are allegedly permitted “if there is space”.

Should institutions that promote higher thinking also promote this new form of self-segregation?

Is this a sign that young people really prefer not to live in harmony with others, but rather “stick with their own kind”?

Is segregation any better if it is done through self-selection?

Canada is usually not terribly far behind the United States in terms of trends. I wonder if this phenomenon will hit Canadian campuses, too? (Let me re-phrase that… I worry that it might.) Does the sad irony of this make you shake your head, too?

I cannot help but wonder, on this very important anniversary, how far we have really come?

I think we still have some work to do when it comes to putting tolerance, understanding and peace first.

What do you think? Is it a good idea to have college residences segregated by religion?

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.

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CILC Pinnacle Award Honorable Mention

November 8, 2012

Sarah Elaine Eaton CILC Pinnacle Award 2011-2012The Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration (CILC) is a national U.S. service that offers virtual learning programs and professional development programs for educators.

I have been offering professional development programs via webinar for teachers and other professionals for a few years now. My programs include:

Every year, CILC confers awards on those who have top scores in their program evaluations — in other words, based on how participants evaluate our programs.

Each school year, the scores of ALL program evaluations for each professional development provider are averaged based on 7 questions which are:

The presenter:

  • was knowledgeable about the content.
  • was engaging.

The program:

  • was engaging.
  • was applicable to professional growth.
  • aligned to presenter’s stated objectives.
  • contained strategies that will impact student learning.
  • will impact my teaching.

Each question has a numerical value and drives the CILC Pinnacle Award.

This year, I was thrilled to receive an honorable mention for high quality virtual programming and PD webinars. This is the second time I have received an honorable mention in the Pinnacle Awards. The first time was in 2009-2010. Check out the list of all the professional development award recipients. Mine is listed under my company, Eaton International Consulting Inc.

I love working with CILC. They create amazing opportunities for students, teachers, administrators, leaders and others to engage in collaborative or innovative programs with presenters from across the globe.

They also create opportunities for people like me, who love to do offer programs virtually, the chance to connect with new people from across the United States.

Thank you to the clients who took the time to evaluate my programs and give them high marks. I love working with you.

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


The Teacher Who Couldn’t Read

May 31, 2011

There’s a belief that literacy in developed, English-speaking countries is “an immigrant problem”, that people who were born in countries like Canada or the US are automatically literate. International surveys conducted in 1994 and 2003 proved that was a myth. The other day I did a post about what those two large-scale tests revealed about literacy rates in Canada.

One astounding fact revealed by IALSS (2003) that tested over 23,000 Canadians, was that 2% of Canadian-born university educated people scored at the lowest levels of literacy… below thousands of immigrants, in fact.

A news story from the US shows us that the situation may not be much different there. John Corcoran, a teacher from the United States who graduated from college with a grade 2 reading level, went on to become a professional teacher who hid his inability to read for years.

This interview from TeachHub.com tells how Corcoran slipped through the cracks, how he adapted and coped in order to have a successful career and how he now runs a non-profit literacy foundation.

Corcoran is living proof that people born in affluent countries can still struggle with literacy. He’s also living proof that people can make tremendous progress as adults, building skills as lifelong learners.

Perhaps the most brilliant part is that Corcoran has learned to read… and write. Now he dedicates his life to helping others do the same.

Related posts:

Related posts

Canada’s 9 Literacy and Essential Skills http://wp.me/pNAh3-qi

Literacy and Essential Skills (video) http://wp.me/pNAh3-y

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


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