Blogging workshop for ESL Teachers

January 7, 2013

iStock-woman at laptopI am super excited about an upcoming workshop I am doing. I get to combine two of my favorite passions: working with language teachers and blogging. Here’s our tentative agenda:

Introduction

  • What is a blog?
  • Why do we blog?

Getting Ready to Blog

  • Tips for creating excellent blog posts
  • Using multimedia in your blog
  • Blogging for and with students

Write on! Hands-on blogging

  • Setting up your blog
  • Writing your first blog post
  • Adding categories, tags and excerpts
  • Creating visual interest with photos

What do you think? Have I missed anything? What words of wisdom would you have for teachers who are learning how to blog for the first time? I’d love to hear your comments and thoughts.

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.

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3 Keys to persuading an audience: ethos, logos and pathos

April 16, 2012

Recently I was coaching a group of high school students for a public speaking competition.

The art of persuasion dates back to the ancient Greeks. Aristotle identified the three main elements of persuasion as ethos, logos and pathos. We talked about these classical rhetorical devices that are considered the keys to a persuasive speech:

Ethos (Ethical appeal)

The English word “ethics” is derived from this Greek word.

Your audience must find you ethical and believable. As a speaker, it is your job to convince your audience that you are credible and that you are worth listening to.

Speak with authority, but not arrogance. Be confident, but not condescending. Be the best version of your truly authentic yourself.

An audience’s respect must be earned. Do not take it for granted.

But your credibility alone is not enough. You also need these other elements:

Logos (Logical appeal)

The English word “logic” is derived from this Greek word.

A well-crafted speech is well organized. It has a logical flow. The message is consistent. It can be helpful out outline a speech as part of your preparation. Check that every element of the speech relates to the point you are trying to make.

Do not ramble or go off on tangets. Focus on the point you want to make and stick to your topic.

Scientists and academics will often have a speech that is laden with logical arguments, but forget to include this next critical element…

Pathos (Emotional appeal)

The English words “passion”  and “compassion” are derived from this Greek word.

Your speech must appeal to the audience on an emotional level. Engage their imagination. Take them on a journey of hope. Say something they will remember and that will impact them on a deep level.

End your speech on a positive note to ensure that you are using pathos for maximum effect. Just remember to include your ethical appeal and a logical argument to balance off a passionate delivery.

Together, ethos, logos and pathos are considered the perfect trifecta of a persuasive speech.  Do you incorporate all three when you’re trying to convince someone of your point of view?

For those of you who are teachers: When you teach presentation skills to students do you teach them about ethos, pathos and logos?

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


Why speaking up is hard to do: Science shows smarts can lead silence

February 8, 2012

Sarah Eaton education literacy speaker CalgaryHave you ever sat there like a lump in a group setting, not knowing what to say? Well, researchers at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have figured out why. Their research study was recently highlighted in the Wall Street Journal. The general gist of it is that if someone perceives that others in a group are smarter or more successful, they will retreat and say less… or nothing at all. Journalist, Elizabeth Bernstein reports that:

“The clamming-up phenomenon seems to be more common in women and in people with higher IQs”.

So, those most likely to keep their traps shut in a group setting are the smart women. (Hhhmmm… Interesting… I am pretty smart and I find it really, really hard to speak up in a group setting, particularly if there are loud, dogmatic extraverts in the group.)

The article went on to say that people who experience this phenomenon are more likely to quietly and silently panic in a group situation, while at the same time being “more attuned to group social dynamics, subconsciously worrying about their performance and evaluating themselves in relation to others”. (Wow, does that ever ring a bell.)

There was no indication that the research also examined language or cultural influences. It make me wonder though… If this is a social phenomenon that applies to native speakers, how much worse does it get for non-native speakers who are in a social setting where “more successful” or “smarter” might also be equated with “more fluent”?

As I reflect on my experience as a language learner, my sense is that this phenomenon would be amplified exponentially in a second language setting. What do you think?

Check out the article in the Wall Street Journal.

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


Apple (Mac) Resources for Presenters, Speakers and Teachers

December 21, 2011

I recently facilitated a lunch meeting at the Calgary chapter of the Canadian Association of Professional Speakers (CAPS). The purpose of the meeting was for presenters, workshop trainers and speakers who use Apple products in their professional practice to share their best ideas and resources.

You can download a copy of these resources and use them in your own teaching, training or speaking practice.

View this document on Scribd

Let me know which ones you like or leave a comment to add to our list!
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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


Best resources of the week (Nov. 20 to 26, 2011)

December 4, 2011

Here are my favorite resources of the week, curated from my Twitter account.

Social Media

Schools would be wise to adopt Granville district’s social media policies – Newark Advocate

How to hide Twitter #hashtag chats from your followers by Dave Larson

The Rise of the Connected Non-Profit from Mashable

10 Things I Learned On My Twitter Journey To 100,000 Followers by John Paul

How 5 Top Brands Crafted Their Social Media Voices by Lauren Indvik

“Don’t do as I say, do as I do” – the role of leadership in promoting the use of social media by Don Ledingham

7 Secrets Of Highly Effective Twitter Power Users  by Lauren Dugan

10 Steps to Kick Start Your Twitter Network from Edte.ch Blog

Proposed social media policy has this school committee in a huff by Sherilynn Macale

Literacy and Essential Skills

Reading to your kid: even more important than you think – The Globe and Mail

How Canadian contemporary authors inspire youth – Imaginaction

Language Learning and Teaching

Chicago Public Schools teacher Kickstarting ESL program through song by Alyssa Vitale

Scaffolding Academic Learning for Second Language Learners by Karen Sue Bradley & Jack Alden Bradley

E-Learning

Activities for online courses: The Beginning by Nicky Hockly

How To Be a Top Learning Organization by Tiffani Murray

7 Things You Should Know about Google Apps from Educause

For some kids, a book is just an iPad that doesn’t work by Ivor Tossell

62 things you can do with Dropbox from MacWorld

Education Resources

Tools for Teaching: Authentic Assessment from the Centre for Teaching and Educational Technologies, Royal Roads University

Flipped Classroom Full Picture: An Example Lesson by Jackie Gerstein

Google Scholar Citations Now Open to All by Ryan Cordell

Education News

Dyslexia may explain my school failure, says Annabel Heseltine by Julie Henry

Ministers of Education Report to Canadians on Official Languages in Education – Canada Newswire

A School System in Maine Gives iPads to Kindergartners from Voice of America

Alberta education minister welcomes input on overhauling system via social media – Metro News

Year-round school: An idea worth exploring – The Windsor Star

Public Speaking and Presentation Skills

Stop Breaking the Basic Rules of Presenting by Ned Potter

App for Speakers: A presentation timer by Takuya Murakami

Secrets from JFK’s Speechwriter by Peter Temple

Writing

How to Write, Launch and Sell Your Informational Ebook by Alexis Grant

Related posts:

Dr. Sarah’s Favorite Resource of the Week (Nov. 13 to 19, 2011)

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


Thanksgiving, gratitude and appreciation: activities with a high-school ESL class

October 26, 2011

Sarah Eaton and Farida Garrett at James Fowler High School: Collaborators on a Lesson in Gratitude

Recently I was invited to speak at James Fowler High School in Calgary to a group of English as a Second Language (ESL) students from the Philippines, Afghanistan, Palestine, Kenya and other countries. The theme was gratitude and appreciation.

My invitation was to visit the class two times. The first time was two weeks ago, during which we incorporated the theme of Canadian Thanksgiving, which had just passed. Today was my second visit to the school. I got to work with the students on their gratitude journals, which they started earlier in the project.

Here’s how we structured the session:

Objectives

  • Learn about Thanksgiving as a celebration
  • Learn new vocabulary around giving thanks
  • Increase students’ awareness of what it means to give thanks and be grateful
  • Develop an understanding of gratitude as a personal, social and cultural practice.

Artifacts, realia and props

  • A pumpkin
  • A banana bread made by the students’ teacher, Mrs. Farida Garrett (It was her idea to share the cake to symbolize “breaking bread” together)
  • Letter blocks that spelled out “Give Thanks”

Supplies

  • markers
  • coloured pencils
  • glue sticks
  • glue gun
  • stickers
  • flip chart paper

Session #1: Activities

Saying thanks – Students shared how they say “thank you” in their native languages. Then, they wrote out the word(s) on a flip chart paper.

Vocabulary building – The words “thanksgiving”, “gratitude”, “gratefulness” and “appreciate” were written out on flip chart paper. Mrs. Garrett drilled students on how to pronounce the words. We worked with students to help them use the words in sentences.

Brief on Thanksgiving – We talked about the celebration of Canadian Thanksgiving, how it originated and what it means.

Making a thank you card – Students made their own thank you cards and thought about who they’d like to give their card to.

In between my first visit and second visit to the school, the students started a gratitude journal.

Session #2 Activities

Review the new vocabulary.

Review what the celebration of Thanksgiving is about.

Students developed their gratitude journals, contributing writing and drawings about what they were grateful for. We asked them to express their appreciation for their family, teacher, school, community and country. Students generated their own ideas about what they appreciated.

What an amazing group of resilient, bright young students Mrs. Fowler has. At the beginning of the first session, students were hesitant to talk and seemed baffled when they were asked to think about people in their lives that they appreciated and why they were grateful to them. By the end of our second session, the students were talking openly about who makes a difference in their lives and why they are grateful to them. In two weeks, they grew leaps and bounds in their personal development, as they learned that recognizing others  and appreciating them is a significant part of cultivating meaningful relationships.

Who deserves your thanks today?

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


Free social media workshop for language educators and literacy practitioners

July 21, 2011

Calling all language teachers, literacy practitioners, trainers and facilitators!

August 8 to 12

Online conference for language teachers and literacy practitioners.

Presenters will share their knowledge of tools such as:

  • Wikis
  • Blogs
  • Voki
  • VoiceThread
  • Posterous
  • Skype
  • Digital Storytelling.

I’m giving a session on how to use online portfolios for evaluation and assessment.

This conference is entirely online, so you can tune in from anywhere, providing you have a high speed internet connection and speakers. The best part is that it is completely and 100% FREE. This event is entirely sponsored by the Language Resource Acquisition Centre at San Diego State University. It’s language educators and trainers sharing what they know, how they learned the tools and how you can, too.

Register here: http://larc.sdsu.edu/social-media-workshop/

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


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