Academic Integrity: Combating Systemic Racism – A Free Resource for Everyone

June 5, 2020

Yesterday the Alberta Council on Academic Integrity (for which I serve as a Steering Committee member) released its formal Statement Against Racism. I was sad, but not suprised that we started getting pushback almost immediately about the statement.  As a result, I have developed this one-page resource to help educate others about how racism is pervasive in discussions about academic misconduct:

Academic Integrity- Combating Systemic Racisim (.jpg)

I am aware that resources do not solve problems. I intend for this resource to be a tool that can help start meaningful conversations about how racism manifests in our beliefs and responses to academic integrity.

Here is a free, downloadable .pdf of this resource. It has a Creative Commons license, so feel free to share it.

Possible uses for this resource:

Poster

  • Discussion tool for staff, educators and administrators
  • Digital resource for sharing
  • Other uses that advocate anti-discrimination and anti-racism in student conduct.

Remember: Academic integrity cannot co-exist with injustice. If discrimination and racism enter into the conversation, we aren’t talking about academic integrity anymore. Academic integrity is based around a set of six fundamental values, as articulated by the International Center for Academic Integrity:

  1. Courage
  2. Fairness
  3. Honesty
  4. Respect
  5. Responsibility
  6. Trust

Inherent in all of this is an underlying respect for persons and human rights. Injustice is antithetical to academic integrity.

I look forward to moving this conversation forward in the coming days, months and years.

Related posts:

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This blog has had over 2 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton, PhD, is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, and the Educational Leader in Residence, Academic Integrity, University of Calgary, Canada. Opinions are my own and do not represent those of the University of Calgary.


Free, online resources for learning Romanian

May 13, 2012

Sarah Eaton, blog, Sarah Elaine EatonIf you’re looking to learn Romanian, here are some free, downloadable resources that may be helpful:

Romanian Reference Grammar (1989) – by Christina N. Hoffman, published by the U.S. Department of State Foreign Service Institute. – This guide is 109 pages and is written in English. Great resource for native English speakers wanting to learn Romanian. Available from: http://fsi-language-courses.org/Courses/Romanian/FSI%20-%20Romanian%20Reference%20Grammar%20-%20Student%20Text.pdf

Romanian Grammar – (n.d.) – Unknown author. – This is a highly detailed and technical grammar manual, spanning 183 pages. Available from: http://www.seelrc.org:8080/grammar/pdf/stand_alone_romanian.pdf

Forvo – Romanian – Online site to help with pronunciation. See: http://www.forvo.com/languages/ro/

Quizlet – A site to make your own flash cards in Romanian. See: http://quizlet.com/5937063/romanian-phrases-flash-cards/#

Note: These resources were originally shared by Paul Widergren on the FLTEACH listserv.

Do you know of other free online resources to learn Romanian? If so, please leave a comment.

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


Resource: Developing EAL services: A guide for communities

July 19, 2011

Prairie Global Management has written this 17-page guide on how to develop services for English as an Additional Language (EAL, also referred to as ESL). The guide covers topics such as:

  • How to start a language program in your community
  • Overcoming the challenges small communities face
  • Criteria for provincial funding
  • How to place and assess students
  • Using Volunteers in EAL delivery
  • and more…

Download your copy of this free resource from: http://www2.immigratemanitoba.com/asset_library/en/resources/pdf/EALguide0208.pdf

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Update – January 2018 – This blog has had over 1.8 million views thanks to readers like you. If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

Sarah Elaine Eaton is a faculty member in the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada.


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