Job Posting: Marketing and Recruiting Manager for Prestigious English Language Program

October 29, 2013

When I wrote the first edition of 101 Ways to Market Your Language Program in 2002 one of the language program directors I interviewed for the book expressed disgust at the very idea of the book, saying that the idea of integrating marketing into educational administration was “blasphemous”.

That was at a time when language program managers had no training, no resources and no budgets for marketing. Many of them still don’t.

Since then I have kept my focus on marketing of language programs of all kinds as part of my career. From heritage language programs to TESL to modern world languages, they all have a place in our classrooms, our communities and yes, even the business world. I created www.marketyourlanguageprogram.com where I offer almost all the resources that I have created over the years for free.

In 2009 I wrote my doctoral thesis on marketing of ESL programs at post-secondary institutions. My supervisor liked that I had an innovative topic in an area that had yet to be researched by anyone (anywhere), but warned me that it might not get me a job. (As it turned out, things have worked out just fine.)

Recently, Georgetown University posted a job for

Manager, Marketing for Recruitment.

You can check out the job description here. The position involves recruiting qualified American English teaching professionals for the English Language Fellow and Specialist Programs. The programs, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, send American teachers around the world to teach English. The jobs are affiliated with and supported by local embassies. What a cool program.

It’s not super clear, but just so it’s forever captured as a graphic, here’s a screen shot of the job posting:

Marketing Manager job posting

Marketing Manager job posting

Slowly, enlightened organizations are beginning to see that marketing our language programs is neither blasphemous nor futile, but rather necessary if we want to endorse, promote and share the importance of learning languages on a global scale. Marketing is serious business. It is unlike any other facet of educational administration or language program management. If we want to get serious about not only saving our language programs, but elevating their importance, we’ve got to go beyond putting up posters in the hallways of our schools to advertise the newest language class, and instead take a professional and strategic approach to recruitment, complete with market research, using metrics to track results and understanding how to demonstrate the concrete impact of language learning to funders, stakeholders and others in our communities.

When prestigious institutions like Georgetown University start creating positions called “Manager, Marketing and Recruitment”  for their language programs (and it’s supported by the U.S. Department of State) other schools are sure to follow.

Does your institution have a marketing manager for its language programs?

If not, what are you waiting for?

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If you enjoyed this post, please “like” it or share it on social media. Thanks!

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If you are interested in booking me (Sarah Eaton) for a presentation, keynote or workshop (either live or via webinar) contact me at sarahelaineeaton (at) gmail.com. Please visit my speaking page, too.


Marketing your language or literacy program: 10 webinars recorded

May 31, 2012

This week we wrapped up our 10-week webinar series on how to market your literacy or language program. Nine of the ten programs featured ideas from  101 Ways to Market Your Language Program. The 10th and final webinar focused on social media, including:

  • Brief overview of social media marketing for non-profit and educational programs
  • Building your social media capacity to market your programs more effectively.
  • Do’s and dont’s of social media marketing.

Here is the tenth webinar recording for you. There are links to the other nine programs below.

If you like these webinars and find them helpful, please share them with others, leave a comment or “like” the video on YouTube.  Thanks to everyone who joined us.

Related post and recordings of past programs:

101 Ways to Market Your Language Program (10 Free webinars) http://wp.me/pNAh3-1j6

#1 Webinar recording: Marketing strategy and planning

#2 Webinar recording: Setting marketing goals and budgets

#3 Webinar recording: Writing effective marketing copy

#4 Webinar recording: Developing written marketing materials

#5 Webinar recording: Identifying what makes you unique

#6 Webinar recording: Speciality tips for programs at large institutions

#7 Webinar recording: The power of your connections

#8 Webinar recording: Relationship marketing

#9 Webinar recording: Effective marketing follow-up

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If you are interested in booking me (Sarah Eaton) for a presentation, keynote or workshop (either live or via webinar) contact me at sarahelaineeaton (at) gmail.com. Please visit my speaking page, too.


Tomorrow: Free webinar on using social media to market literacy and language programs

May 29, 2012

Tomorrow we wrap up our series of ten free webinars on how to market literacy programs and language schools.

Each webinar has highlighted different ideas from 101 Ways to Market Your Language Program. Tomorrow is a little different in that the ideas and strategies provided are brand new information, not published in the book. The program will be  30 to 60 minutes in length. Bring a pen and paper. I’m going to give you lots of ideas you can implement right away.

Webinar #10 of 10 – What to expect

Today’s webinar will focus on:

  • Brief overview of social media marketing for non-profit and educational programs
  • Building your social media capacity to market your programs more effectively.
  • Do’s and dont’s of social media marketing.

Webinar time

Date: Wednesday, May 30, 2012

There are some time zone changes coming up around the world, so double-check these times against your local area:

Point of origin – 14:00 (2:00 p.m.) Mountain Time, May 16, 2012 Calgary / Edmonton

16:00 (4:00 p.m.) – Eastern Time – Toronto / New York

20:00 (8:00 p.m.) – Greenwich Time – London, England

22:00 (10:00 p.m.) – Eastern European Time – Athens / Istanbul

05:00 (5:00 a.m.) – following day – Japan Standard Time – Tokyo

How to log in

There is no need to register. These webinars are free and open to everyone. Seating is limited though, so sign on early.

To join the webinar, simply click here: http://meet11548754.adobeconnect.com/saraheaton/

Will it be recorded?

You bet. I’ll record the program and post it within 24 hours or so. No charges or fees to watch these recorded programs.

Related post and recordings of past programs:

101 Ways to Market Your Language Program (10 Free webinars) http://wp.me/pNAh3-1j6

#1 Webinar recording: Marketing strategy and planning

#2 Webinar recording: Setting marketing goals and budgets

#3 Webinar recording: Writing effective marketing copy

#4 Webinar recording: Developing written marketing materials

#5 Webinar recording: Identifying what makes you unique

#6 Webinar recording: Speciality tips for programs at large institutions

#7 Webinar recording: The power of your connections

#8 Webinar recording: Relationship marketing

#9 Webinar recording: Effective marketing follow-up

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Share or Tweet this post:  Tomorrow: Free webinar on using social media to market literacy and language programs http://wp.me/pNAh3-1ql

If you are interested in booking me (Sarah Eaton) for a presentation, keynote or workshop (either live or via webinar) contact me at sarahelaineeaton (at) gmail.com. Please visit my speaking page, too.


Today’s free webinar on marketing literacy and language schools: Effective Marketing Follow-Up

May 16, 2012

We’ll have Webinar #9 on Wednesday, May 23.

Today we’re having the ninth in a series of ten free webinars on how to market and promote literacy programs and language schools.

Each webinar highlight different ideas from 101 Ways to Market Your Language Program. Every week you get practical, low-cost ideas to help you promote your program. Best of all, you’ll get to connect with others on line who are also interested in the same topic, ask questions and interact.

The webinars are  30 to 60 minutes in length. Bring a pen and paper. I’m going to give you lots of ideas you can implement right away.

Webinar #9 of 10 – What to expect

Today’s webinar will focus on:

  • Effective follow up.
  • Building patience into your marekting.
  • Not giving up too soon.

Webinar time

Date: Wednesday, May 16, 2012

There are some time zone changes coming up around the world, so double-check these times against your local area:

Point of origin – 14:00 (2:00 p.m.) Mountain Time, May 16, 2012 Calgary / Edmonton

16:00 (4:00 p.m.) – Eastern Time – Toronto / New York

20:00 (8:00 p.m.) – Greenwich Time – London, England

22:00 (10:00 p.m.) – Eastern European Time – Athens / Istanbul

05:00 (5:00 a.m.) – following day – Japan Standard Time – Tokyo

How to log in

There is no need to register. These webinars are free and open to everyone. Seating is limited though, so sign on early.

To join the webinar, simply click here: http://meet11548754.adobeconnect.com/saraheaton/

Will it be recorded?

You bet. I’ll record the program and post it within 24 hours or so. No charges or fees to watch these recorded programs.

What will future webinars cover?

Here’s what we’ll cover in our final program next week:

  • Week #10 – Social media for marketing.

All you have to do is block off Wednesdays in your calendar at your corresponding local time and then log in using the link above.

If you can’t make the webinar, and you’d like to ask a question about the topic, feel free to leave me a comment. I’ll do my best to answer questions that come in before the program during the webinar. You can watch the recording to get the answer to your question, or I’ll answer you back in the comment section.

Related post:

101 Ways to Market Your Language Program (10 Free webinars) http://wp.me/pNAh3-1j6

Recordings of past programs:

#1 Webinar recording

#2 Webinar recording

#3 Webinar recording

#4 Webinar recording

#5 Webinar recording

#6 Webinar recording

#7 Webinar recording

#8 Webinar recording

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Share or Tweet this post:  Today’s free webinar on marketing literacy and language schools: Effective Marketing Follow-Up http://wp.me/pNAh3-1ph

If you are interested in booking me (Sarah Eaton) for a presentation, keynote or workshop (either live or via webinar) contact me at sarahelaineeaton (at) gmail.com. Please visit my speaking page, too.


5 key tips for language and literacy programs on how to use letterhead and envelopes effectively

December 30, 2011

It makes me crazy when I receive a letter with the printed address crossed out because the organization moved and is trying to save paper by using outdated letter head. Your program deserves its own letterhead, with matching envelopes.

Even worse, I shudder when I receive a poorly formatted letter from an organization that prides itself on helping others build their skills through language and literacy education.

Among the 9 Literacy and Essential Skills, one of them is writing. It is important for language and literacy organizations to lead by example when it comes to written communications. Not only does this help you with your organizational branding and marketing, it also helps to ensure that you are demonstrating leadership when it comes to the art and business of written communications.

Tip #1 – Letterhead must contain your contact information

Proper letterhead will include organizational information such as:

  • your mailing address, including the postal code
  • telephone and fax numbers, including the area code
  • organizational logo, if you have one
  • general e-mail address for the organization (e.g. info@…)
  • your website address

It is also becoming common to include social media contact information such as your organizational Twitter account or Facebook page, but these are less critical than your basic contact information.

If your program is housed within a larger organization, ensure that your specific mailing address, including the location of your program office, is indicated on your letterhead. If this information is left out, written correspondence is more likely to get lost or take longer to arrive because it can be delivered to the wrong office in error.

Tip #2 – Have matching envelopes in different sizes

All too often, I have seen literacy or language program letterhead with matching standard-size letter envelopes, but when it comes to mailing out program information and brochures, only plain brown envelopes are used. And worse, sometimes in the busy office environment, staff may forget to make labels for the return address.

If costs are prohibitive and your program can not afford envelopes printed in a variety of sizes, at the very least, buy some inexpensive labels that can be printed off at your office that contain your contact information. Ensure that all staff, including part-time or evening staff who are allowed to send mail on behalf of the organization, have access to organizational stationery, including return address labels.

Tip #3: Include the date and the recipient’s information near the top of the letter

Traditionally, this information is printed on the left-hand side of the letter. If you do not use a word-processing template that automatically tells you where to insert this information, insert 6 to 10 lines before writing the date. Start with the date and follow it with the recipient’s address.

Abbreviations of the date are not usually used in letters. There are two generally accepted formats:

North American format: December 30, 2011

European format: 30 December 2011

The North American format includes a comma between the day and the year. The European format contains no comma.

Two or three lines below this, the recipient’s information is written in this format:

Name (write out their full first and last name)

Title or position

Address Line 1

Address Line 2 (if necessary)

City, State (or Province), postal code, Country

There are accepted variations on this format, but it is important to include the date and the recipient’s information in a relatively standardized way that it is used consistently across the organization.

Tip #4: Fold letters appropriately

For letters that are inserted into a standard-size envelope (in North America, that is a #10 envelope), they should be folded twice, so that the end result is a piece of paper that is divided neatly into thirds.

The proper method is to fold the letter into thirds starting and the bottom and ending at the top, so that when the process is reversed and the letter is unfolded, the top third of the letter is what shows first. In other words, when the flap of the first fold opens outwards, it reveals the recipient’s name and address. The reason for this is rooted in office traditions where a secretary would receive and open all the mail for an organization. Envelopes were generally opened all at the same time using a letter opener. The letter opener was slid along the long side of the envelope, which had been sealed by the sender. Letters were taken out of their envelopes one by one.

In the event that a letter had been received by the wrong recipient in error, the secretary would know immediately, when she (and it was usually a she) opened the first flap of the letter. The intended recipient’s name and address would be visible, but the main body of the letter would remain hidden, due to the fact that the letter had only been unfolded part way.

Knowing immediately that the letter had been received in error, the discreet secretary would refold the letter (supposedly without bothering to open it the rest of the way and read it) and then ensure that the letter was delivered to its intended recipient.

If the folds are reversed so that the first flap reveals the senders signature, the entire letter has to be fully opened before any errors might be detected.

Tip #5: Use proper salutations and closings in your letters

Business letters traditionally start this way:

Dear (Title – e.g. Mr., Ms., Dr., etc.) (Recipient’s surname):

Business letters use a colon, not a comma, after the recipient’s name. Commas are used in personal, hand-written letters.

Though it has become common place in North America to use a person’s first name in the salutation of a business letter, the tradition with a typed or computer-printed letter is to write out the person’s title and last name. If the sender knows the recipient well and they are on a first name basis, then the sender strikes out the title and last name with a pen, and writes the person’s first name by hand above their printed name. This shows  formal respect, acknowledgement of the first-name relationship and attention to detail on the part of the sender. Ideally, this is done with the same pen that the sender uses to sign the letter.

Having said that, I have been known to opt for the increasingly accepted method of addressing a letter to a colleague whom I know well by his or her first name. When I do though, it is a conscious choice on my part, rather than accepted standard. It is important for those working in literacy and educational organizations to know the proper standards in order to make informed professional choices.

I have also taught this tradition to students in my Effective Learning courses, as all too often, they seem to think it is acceptable to start a letter with salutations such as: “Dear Miss” (no name, just “Miss”), “Dear Teacher” or “Hi”. Heaven help them if they start a letter with “Hey there!” Once you know the proper way, you can make your own choices from there, but at least they are informed choices. There is a difference between breaking the rules and not knowing them in the first place. Language and literacy professionals, in my professional opinion, should be the last to plead ignorance in matters relating to writing. (Boy, that sounded snotty, didn’t it? Well, so be it…)

Moving right along, appropriate closings for business letters are:

Sincerely,

Yours truly,

Best regards,

Closings are followed by a comma. Four or five lines are left below the closing for the signature. Then, the sender’s name is computer-printed. His or her title or position may be written on the line below, if desired.

There are minor variations on these guidelines and some readers might think that I’ve suddenly become very stuffy or nit-picky by suggesting that letters need to be folded in a particular way. I confess to a certain amount of sadness and dismay when I receive letters on letter head that has an address from two office moves ago, envelopes with no return address or letters folded so that the body of the letter shows on the outside of the folds, rather than the inside of the fold. When these gaffes happen in letters from literacy and educational organizations, they make me downright me crazy.

Your program stationery is part of your organizational marketing and branding. If you intend to market your program effectively, start with the basics. Ensure that you have a complete set of stationery with up-to-date contact information.

Your organizational image, however, goes beyond having letterhead with your logo stamped on it. Insist that everyone working in the office use official stationery for all office correspondence and use it in a way that demonstrates high levels of text literacy and leadership in the art of writing professionally.

This post is adapted from “Idea #19: Have letterhead and matching envelopes made for your program ” in 101 Ways to Market Your Language Program

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If you are interested in booking me (Sarah Eaton) for a presentation, keynote or workshop (either live or via webinar) contact me at sarahelaineeaton (at) gmail.com. Please visit my speaking page, too.


How to market your language or literacy program: Build trust over time

October 30, 2011

If you send prospective students a brochure or answer an e-mail, they are not very likely to register in your program. Here’s why…

Marketers tell us that we need to see an advertisement or hear a message at least seven times before we are likely to buy a product. Sales professionals say that it can take anywhere between five and 27 “touches” or contact with a prospective buyer before they are convinced to make a purchase from you.

What does that mean for language programs and literacy organizations? It means that we can not simply send out a brochure to a student and reasonable expect that suddenly he or she will want to register in our program.

The “drip theory” recommends regular, repeated contact – at least six or seven times – with a prospect to ensure that your name sticks in her mind. This does not mean sending out six or seven copies of the same brochure! There is a difference between “dripping” and “bombarding” or worse yet, “stalking”.

Each “touch” needs to be different — and still relevant. For example, connecting via e-mail, followed by sending a brochure, followed a week later by an invitation to register, followed by a couple of monthly newsletters.

The timing of each contact is also important. Bombarding someone in seven different ways in a very short period of time is more likely to turn them off than to convince them that they want to join your program. There is no one perfect formula for how often you should connect with your prospects… Once a week or a few times a week seems to be an accepted norm in the educational and non-profit sectors. There seems to be a lower tolerance for repeated contact in a short period of time with prospects in the social sectors than there is in the business sectors.

In my PhD research, I found that it can take anywhere from two to five years to get a new language program off the ground. That is the “sales cycle” for English as an Additional Language (ESL / EFL / EAL / ESOL) programs. It can also take up to two years to convert a prospective student into a current student.

In Guerrilla Marketing for NonProfits, authors Jay Conrad Levinson, Frank Adkins and Chris Forbes talk about how non-profit organizations often give up too soon. They expect to see results NOW. If they do not get an immediate response (which is highly unlikely) they give up. In fact, they say that most non-profits give up on new programs just before they hit the point of success.

If you get an e-mail address for the prospect and you can send monthly updates about what is going on in your program, you will be using yet another medium to show your prospects that you have not forgotten about them.

Ideally, you want to combine different types of contact: social media, mail, e-mail, phone calls and personal contact. This is not always easy in an international marketplace, but do try for repeated contact in a variety of ways.

If you don’t get any response after several tries, then you can change the prospect from active to inactive in your database. In any case, you are more likely to get more registrants by using the drip effect than by sending an initial brochure and nothing else.

Here are seven ways to help you market your language or literacy program consistently

1) List all of the methods you use to connect with your prospective learners (phone, e-mail, drop-in, brochures, etc.).

2) Set up a spreadsheet with each method of contact across the top.

3) Every time a prospect contacts you, ask for his or her contact information.

4) Note the date that you made contact under the appropriate column.

5) Make an effort to stay in touch with the prospective learner, at least once a week, using a different method each time.

6) If a prospective student shows a preference for a particular type of communication, use that one more often. For example, if a prospective student does not respond to e-mails, but calls or Skypes, then make a note of it. At least once, take the initiative to connect with the prospect in the way that they prefer. It’s about them, after all.

7) Track how many prospective students actually end up enrolling in your program and how long it takes. You may be surprised to find that it take  longer than you think it will, or longer than you would like it to. This does not mean that should try to accelerate that cycle. That can often backfire and turn prospects off. It is useful, however, to show you how long prospective learners may take to make a decision.

It’s not about trying to force them to make a decision faster. It is about cultivating trust and building a relationship with them so that when they are ready to make a decision, they choose your program because they feel that they know you and that you care about them. When the time comes for them to make their decision, trust will often be the factor that sways people one way or another. If you haven’t built the trust with them over time, they may never register. That takes time. In the long run, it is worth it.

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This post is adapted from “Idea #17: Be a Drip ” in 101 Ways to Market Your Language Program

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If you are interested in booking me (Sarah Eaton) for a presentation, keynote or workshop (either live or via webinar) contact me at sarahelaineeaton (at) gmail.com. Please visit my speaking page, too.


Marketing tip: Ask your students where they heard about you

August 20, 2011

This is a simple way of determining which method of marketing works for your language or literacy program: Ask your students how they heard about you. Do most of your students find out about you through the Internet? …word of mouth? …your brochure? … trade fairs? Once you figure out what has proven most successful, you will know where to focus more of your marketing dollars.

I suggest getting this valuable information in writing. Whether it is through an evaluation form or an exit interview where the results are recorded, get the information in concrete written form. Compare it from year to year. See if your most successful marketing strategy changes over time.

Of course, we know that word of mouth is the most powerful way to market your program. If the majority of your students come to you through word of mouth, then you are very lucky. Most language schools need to combine word of mouth with other marketing efforts.

But what other marketing efforts are successful for you? You may be surprised. You may be pouring thousands of dollars into a fancy brochure and find out that 85% of your students used the Internet to find you. If that is the case, you would want to drive more of your marketing dollars into the Internet (maybe pay for a higher ranking on a search engine or get a banner ad onto other people’s sites). Once you know what has proven successful, you can use that information to generate even more interest and registrations.
Marketing materials: tools and tips to do the job better

This post is adapted from “Idea #18” in 101 Ways to Market Your Language Program

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If you are interested in booking me (Sarah Eaton) for a presentation, keynote or workshop (either live or via webinar) contact me at sarahelaineeaton (at) gmail.com. Please visit my speaking page, too.


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